Trump fires up feud in Republican party over fundraising

A fiery Donald Trump isn’t giving up control of fundraising prowess without a fight.

The former president hit back at the Republican National Committee Tuesday for refusing to stop using his name or likeness to raise cash.

“I fully support the Republican Party and important GOP Committees, but I do not support RINOs and fools, and it is not their right to use my likeness or image to raise funds,” Trump said using his 45 Office email feed.

His lawyers had pushed the RNC to cease-and-desist on Monday, but the party didn’t play nice.

RNC chief counsel Justin Riemer, according to Politico, said they have “every right to refer to public figures” and they are protected by the First Amendment “and it will continue to do so in pursuit of these common goals.”

Politico added Trump and the RNC were a juggernaut in 2020, raising $366 million for Republicans running for office. Now Trump, as a private citizen, is drawing a line.

“So much money is being raised and completely wasted by people that do not have the GOP’s best interests in mind,” Trump added. “If you donate to our Save America PAC at DonaldJTrump.com, you are helping the America First movement and doing it right. We will WIN, and we will WIN BIG! Our Country is being destroyed by the Democrats!”

MassGOP chairman Jim Lyons said he’s siding with Trump.

“He has an absolute right to use his name as he sees fit,” Lyons told the Herald. “It’s his reputation.”

And at last month’s influential CPAC conference, Trump vowed he’ll be out on the campaign trail “actively working” to back “strong” Republican candidates, and even hinted he may himself run again.

It was his first speech since leaving the White House add he said he will be “actively working to elect strong, tough and smart Republican leaders” in the midterms.

“With your help, we will take back the House, we will win the Senate and then a Republican president will make a triumphant return to the White House, and I wonder who that will be,” Trump said. “Who, who, who will that be? I wonder.”

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